Workers at the Shuangyashan Mine in Heilongjiang province, northeastern China. China’s 15 northern provinces and regions account for 60 per cent of the land, 42 per cent of the population and 35 per cent of economic output. Photo: Reuters Workers at the Shuangyashan Mine in Heilongjiang province, northeastern China. China’s 15 northern provinces and regions account for 60 per cent of the land, 42 per cent of the population and 35 per cent of economic output. Photo: Reuters
Workers at the Shuangyashan Mine in Heilongjiang province, northeastern China. China’s 15 northern provinces and regions account for 60 per cent of the land, 42 per cent of the population and 35 per cent of economic output. Photo: Reuters
David Dodwell
Opinion

Opinion

Inside Out by David Dodwell

How Covid-19 has worsened China’s growing north-south economic divide

  • China’s east-west divide remains a challenge, but an emerging divide – between north and south – is also worrying. The north is unlikely to be helped by the ‘dual circulation’ strategy, which is more likely to benefit the Greater Bay Area

Workers at the Shuangyashan Mine in Heilongjiang province, northeastern China. China’s 15 northern provinces and regions account for 60 per cent of the land, 42 per cent of the population and 35 per cent of economic output. Photo: Reuters Workers at the Shuangyashan Mine in Heilongjiang province, northeastern China. China’s 15 northern provinces and regions account for 60 per cent of the land, 42 per cent of the population and 35 per cent of economic output. Photo: Reuters
Workers at the Shuangyashan Mine in Heilongjiang province, northeastern China. China’s 15 northern provinces and regions account for 60 per cent of the land, 42 per cent of the population and 35 per cent of economic output. Photo: Reuters
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David Dodwell

David Dodwell

David Dodwell is the executive director of the Hong Kong-APEC Trade Policy Study Group, a trade policy think tank.