An elderly woman shops at a supermarket in Beijing on December 17. Photo: AFP An elderly woman shops at a supermarket in Beijing on December 17. Photo: AFP
An elderly woman shops at a supermarket in Beijing on December 17. Photo: AFP
Neal Kimberley
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Neal Kimberley

Global food prices are going up and China won’t be spared, despite the November dip

  • As a major food importer, China is not immune to rising global prices, driven up by supply issues and a weaker US dollar
  • A strong yuan can only offer so much protection

An elderly woman shops at a supermarket in Beijing on December 17. Photo: AFP An elderly woman shops at a supermarket in Beijing on December 17. Photo: AFP
An elderly woman shops at a supermarket in Beijing on December 17. Photo: AFP
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Neal Kimberley

Neal Kimberley

UK-based Neal Kimberley has been active in the financial markets since 1985. Having worked in sales and trading in the dealing rooms of major banks in London for many years, he moved to ThomsonReuters in 2009 to provide market analysis. He has been contributing to the Post since 2015 and writes about macroeconomics from a market perspective, with a particular emphasis on currencies and interest rates.