The US Capitol in Washington. The confluence of the second wave of Covid-19 and a double-dip in the US economy has left US policymakers with little choice but to approve another relief package, this time for US$900 billion. Photo: AFP
The US Capitol in Washington. The confluence of the second wave of Covid-19 and a double-dip in the US economy has left US policymakers with little choice but to approve another relief package, this time for US$900 billion. Photo: AFP
Stephen Roach
Opinion

Opinion

Stephen Roach

The coronavirus pandemic may cast a longer economic shadow on the US than policymakers think

  • Mass vaccination does not provide immunity against longer-term economic damage. And research on major pandemics dating back to the 14th century suggests that Covid-19’s impact on the US economy is likely to be far-reaching and profound

The US Capitol in Washington. The confluence of the second wave of Covid-19 and a double-dip in the US economy has left US policymakers with little choice but to approve another relief package, this time for US$900 billion. Photo: AFP
The US Capitol in Washington. The confluence of the second wave of Covid-19 and a double-dip in the US economy has left US policymakers with little choice but to approve another relief package, this time for US$900 billion. Photo: AFP
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