Shoppers walk through Macy’s flagship Herald Square store in New York on the most recent Black Friday, on November 27. There is every possibility that, as America emerges from the pandemic, US consumers will continue their love affair with Chinese goods. Photo: Bloomberg Shoppers walk through Macy’s flagship Herald Square store in New York on the most recent Black Friday, on November 27. There is every possibility that, as America emerges from the pandemic, US consumers will continue their love affair with Chinese goods. Photo: Bloomberg
Shoppers walk through Macy’s flagship Herald Square store in New York on the most recent Black Friday, on November 27. There is every possibility that, as America emerges from the pandemic, US consumers will continue their love affair with Chinese goods. Photo: Bloomberg
Neal Kimberley
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Neal Kimberley

Why the US dollar’s mini-revival won’t take the wind out of the yuan rally

  • The Fed’s policy to keep a lid on Treasury yields, to boost job creation and the economy, will weigh on the value of the US dollar because investors will rationally look for better returns elsewhere, notably China

Shoppers walk through Macy’s flagship Herald Square store in New York on the most recent Black Friday, on November 27. There is every possibility that, as America emerges from the pandemic, US consumers will continue their love affair with Chinese goods. Photo: Bloomberg Shoppers walk through Macy’s flagship Herald Square store in New York on the most recent Black Friday, on November 27. There is every possibility that, as America emerges from the pandemic, US consumers will continue their love affair with Chinese goods. Photo: Bloomberg
Shoppers walk through Macy’s flagship Herald Square store in New York on the most recent Black Friday, on November 27. There is every possibility that, as America emerges from the pandemic, US consumers will continue their love affair with Chinese goods. Photo: Bloomberg
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Neal Kimberley

Neal Kimberley

UK-based Neal Kimberley has been active in the financial markets since 1985. Having worked in sales and trading in the dealing rooms of major banks in London for many years, he moved to ThomsonReuters in 2009 to provide market analysis. He has been contributing to the Post since 2015 and writes about macroeconomics from a market perspective, with a particular emphasis on currencies and interest rates.