A container is moved at the Qinzhou port in south China’s Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region on December 28. Photo: Xinhua A container is moved at the Qinzhou port in south China’s Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region on December 28. Photo: Xinhua
A container is moved at the Qinzhou port in south China’s Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region on December 28. Photo: Xinhua
David Dodwell
Opinion

Opinion

Inside Out by David Dodwell

Covid-19 pandemic’s ‘butterfly effect’ on shipping containers reveals the need to prioritise supply resilience over efficiency

  • The wide-ranging impact of the pandemic continues to unfold, not least in stranded containers and a disrupted supply chain
  • When even the smallest changes can cause big effects, we need to pay more practical attention to the resilience and security of critical supplies

A container is moved at the Qinzhou port in south China’s Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region on December 28. Photo: Xinhua A container is moved at the Qinzhou port in south China’s Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region on December 28. Photo: Xinhua
A container is moved at the Qinzhou port in south China’s Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region on December 28. Photo: Xinhua
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David Dodwell

David Dodwell

David Dodwell is the executive director of the Hong Kong-APEC Trade Policy Study Group, a trade policy think tank.