People select vegetables at a supermarket in Beijing on February 10. There is little chance of China, the growth engine of the global economy, exporting inflation any time soon. Photo: AFP People select vegetables at a supermarket in Beijing on February 10. There is little chance of China, the growth engine of the global economy, exporting inflation any time soon. Photo: AFP
People select vegetables at a supermarket in Beijing on February 10. There is little chance of China, the growth engine of the global economy, exporting inflation any time soon. Photo: AFP
Nicholas Spiro
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Nicholas Spiro

Why inflation risks are the last thing investors should worry about right now

  • While fears of runaway prices should be taken seriously, the priority for economies battered by Covid-19 is still to get the pandemic under control
  • With the mass roll-out of vaccines proving more challenging than expected, markets should be closely watching how this will affect company profits

People select vegetables at a supermarket in Beijing on February 10. There is little chance of China, the growth engine of the global economy, exporting inflation any time soon. Photo: AFP People select vegetables at a supermarket in Beijing on February 10. There is little chance of China, the growth engine of the global economy, exporting inflation any time soon. Photo: AFP
People select vegetables at a supermarket in Beijing on February 10. There is little chance of China, the growth engine of the global economy, exporting inflation any time soon. Photo: AFP
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Nicholas Spiro

Nicholas Spiro

Nicholas Spiro is a partner at Lauressa Advisory, a specialist London-based real estate and macroeconomic advisory firm. He is an expert on advanced and emerging economies and a regular commentator on financial and macro-political developments.