A Chinese marine surveillance ship sails near Japan Coast Guard vessels (out of shot) and a Japanese fishing boat near one of the disputed Diaoyu Islands on July 1, 2013. Photo: Kyodo/Reuters A Chinese marine surveillance ship sails near Japan Coast Guard vessels (out of shot) and a Japanese fishing boat near one of the disputed Diaoyu Islands on July 1, 2013. Photo: Kyodo/Reuters
A Chinese marine surveillance ship sails near Japan Coast Guard vessels (out of shot) and a Japanese fishing boat near one of the disputed Diaoyu Islands on July 1, 2013. Photo: Kyodo/Reuters
Mark J. Valencia
Opinion

Opinion

Mark J. Valencia

East China Sea: how China and Japan can begin to resolve the Diaoyu Islands dispute

  • Japan should acknowledge there is a legitimate sovereignty dispute and that the features cannot be used as a basis for exclusive economic zone or continental shelf claims
  • In exchange, China could tacitly accept Japan’s temporary administration of the features

A Chinese marine surveillance ship sails near Japan Coast Guard vessels (out of shot) and a Japanese fishing boat near one of the disputed Diaoyu Islands on July 1, 2013. Photo: Kyodo/Reuters A Chinese marine surveillance ship sails near Japan Coast Guard vessels (out of shot) and a Japanese fishing boat near one of the disputed Diaoyu Islands on July 1, 2013. Photo: Kyodo/Reuters
A Chinese marine surveillance ship sails near Japan Coast Guard vessels (out of shot) and a Japanese fishing boat near one of the disputed Diaoyu Islands on July 1, 2013. Photo: Kyodo/Reuters
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Mark J. Valencia

Mark J. Valencia

Dr Mark J. Valencia is an internationally known maritime policy analyst, political commentator and consultant focused on Asia. He is the author or editor of some 15 books and more than 100 peer-reviewed journal articles. Currently he is adjunct senior scholar at the National Institute for South China Sea Studies.