A woman holds up US dollar and Chinese renminbi banknotes in Qionghai, in south China’s Hainan province, on January 7, 2016. Photo: Xinhua A woman holds up US dollar and Chinese renminbi banknotes in Qionghai, in south China’s Hainan province, on January 7, 2016. Photo: Xinhua
A woman holds up US dollar and Chinese renminbi banknotes in Qionghai, in south China’s Hainan province, on January 7, 2016. Photo: Xinhua
David Brown
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by David Brown

As the coronavirus pandemic eases, the US dollar’s fortunes look challenging

  • When the dollar loses its edge, don’t despair – it’s a sign that the global economy is bouncing back
  • The world returning to some sense of normality means Beijing will have to accept a stronger renminbi as the flip side of the dollar losing its lustre

A woman holds up US dollar and Chinese renminbi banknotes in Qionghai, in south China’s Hainan province, on January 7, 2016. Photo: Xinhua A woman holds up US dollar and Chinese renminbi banknotes in Qionghai, in south China’s Hainan province, on January 7, 2016. Photo: Xinhua
A woman holds up US dollar and Chinese renminbi banknotes in Qionghai, in south China’s Hainan province, on January 7, 2016. Photo: Xinhua
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David Brown

David Brown

David Brown is the chief executive of New View Economics. Over a career spanning four decades in London, David held roles as chief economist in a number of international investment banks.