Chinese Vice-Premier Liu He and US President Donald Trump after signing phase one of the US-China trade agreement during a ceremony at the White House on January 15, 2020. Photo: Reuters Chinese Vice-Premier Liu He and US President Donald Trump after signing phase one of the US-China trade agreement during a ceremony at the White House on January 15, 2020. Photo: Reuters
Chinese Vice-Premier Liu He and US President Donald Trump after signing phase one of the US-China trade agreement during a ceremony at the White House on January 15, 2020. Photo: Reuters
Neal Kimberley
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Neal Kimberley

Why China might prefer dealmaker Donald Trump’s transactional stance to politician Joe Biden’s playbook

  • While the Trump administration had no problem ‘haggling over the price of chickens’ with Beijing, Biden’s team seems focused on the re-establishment of a broader US negotiating position

Chinese Vice-Premier Liu He and US President Donald Trump after signing phase one of the US-China trade agreement during a ceremony at the White House on January 15, 2020. Photo: Reuters Chinese Vice-Premier Liu He and US President Donald Trump after signing phase one of the US-China trade agreement during a ceremony at the White House on January 15, 2020. Photo: Reuters
Chinese Vice-Premier Liu He and US President Donald Trump after signing phase one of the US-China trade agreement during a ceremony at the White House on January 15, 2020. Photo: Reuters
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Neal Kimberley

Neal Kimberley

UK-based Neal Kimberley has been active in the financial markets since 1985. Having worked in sales and trading in the dealing rooms of major banks in London for many years, he moved to ThomsonReuters in 2009 to provide market analysis. He has been contributing to the Post since 2015 and writes about macroeconomics from a market perspective, with a particular emphasis on currencies and interest rates.