People line up to receive a Sinovac jab in Hong Kong on February 26. The Chinese vaccine is not accredited in much of the world, making it unlikely to be accepted for any international vaccine passport for travel to the US and Europe. Photo: EPA-EFE People line up to receive a Sinovac jab in Hong Kong on February 26. The Chinese vaccine is not accredited in much of the world, making it unlikely to be accepted for any international vaccine passport for travel to the US and Europe. Photo: EPA-EFE
People line up to receive a Sinovac jab in Hong Kong on February 26. The Chinese vaccine is not accredited in much of the world, making it unlikely to be accepted for any international vaccine passport for travel to the US and Europe. Photo: EPA-EFE
David Dodwell
Opinion

Opinion

Outside In by David Dodwell

What will it take for the world to cooperate on Covid-19 vaccines and passports?

  • Without working together, there is little hope of tackling unprecedented vaccine supply challenges, waiving vaccine patent rights and agreeing on vaccine passports

People line up to receive a Sinovac jab in Hong Kong on February 26. The Chinese vaccine is not accredited in much of the world, making it unlikely to be accepted for any international vaccine passport for travel to the US and Europe. Photo: EPA-EFE People line up to receive a Sinovac jab in Hong Kong on February 26. The Chinese vaccine is not accredited in much of the world, making it unlikely to be accepted for any international vaccine passport for travel to the US and Europe. Photo: EPA-EFE
People line up to receive a Sinovac jab in Hong Kong on February 26. The Chinese vaccine is not accredited in much of the world, making it unlikely to be accepted for any international vaccine passport for travel to the US and Europe. Photo: EPA-EFE
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David Dodwell

David Dodwell

David Dodwell is the executive director of the Hong Kong-APEC Trade Policy Study Group, a trade policy think tank.