A steel factory in Chengde, China’s northern Hebei province. China’s steel industry is the largest source of carbon emissions among 31 manufacturing sectors in China. Photo: AFP A steel factory in Chengde, China’s northern Hebei province. China’s steel industry is the largest source of carbon emissions among 31 manufacturing sectors in China. Photo: AFP
A steel factory in Chengde, China’s northern Hebei province. China’s steel industry is the largest source of carbon emissions among 31 manufacturing sectors in China. Photo: AFP
Neal Kimberley
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Neal Kimberley

How China and the US are heading for win-win cooperation on one issue, at least – steel

  • In pursuit of China’s goal of reducing its carbon footprint, regulators are moving to cut crude steel production
  • This would also address US concerns about Chinese overproduction in the steel industry

A steel factory in Chengde, China’s northern Hebei province. China’s steel industry is the largest source of carbon emissions among 31 manufacturing sectors in China. Photo: AFP A steel factory in Chengde, China’s northern Hebei province. China’s steel industry is the largest source of carbon emissions among 31 manufacturing sectors in China. Photo: AFP
A steel factory in Chengde, China’s northern Hebei province. China’s steel industry is the largest source of carbon emissions among 31 manufacturing sectors in China. Photo: AFP
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Neal Kimberley

Neal Kimberley

UK-based Neal Kimberley has been active in the financial markets since 1985. Having worked in sales and trading in the dealing rooms of major banks in London for many years, he moved to ThomsonReuters in 2009 to provide market analysis. He has been contributing to the Post since 2015 and writes about macroeconomics from a market perspective, with a particular emphasis on currencies and interest rates.