A Chinese flag is seen on the top of a car near a coal-fired power plant in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, in November 2019. To smooth the way for international investors to enter China’s green finance market, the PBOC this year revised issuance guidelines to remove “clean utilisation of fossil fuels” from the list of projects that can qualify as “green”. Photo: Reuters
A Chinese flag is seen on the top of a car near a coal-fired power plant in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, in November 2019. To smooth the way for international investors to enter China’s green finance market, the PBOC this year revised issuance guidelines to remove “clean utilisation of fossil fuels” from the list of projects that can qualify as “green”. Photo: Reuters
Aidan Yao
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Aidan Yao

Despite the risks, China’s green bonds will prove rewarding for global investors

  • The market, already the world’s second largest, is expected to grow further in size, depth and liquidity to meet China’s ambitious net-zero carbon target
  • Strengthening information disclosure and a more rigorous definition of what counts as a green bond will add to the appeal, on top of its diverse offerings and high yields

A Chinese flag is seen on the top of a car near a coal-fired power plant in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, in November 2019. To smooth the way for international investors to enter China’s green finance market, the PBOC this year revised issuance guidelines to remove “clean utilisation of fossil fuels” from the list of projects that can qualify as “green”. Photo: Reuters
A Chinese flag is seen on the top of a car near a coal-fired power plant in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, in November 2019. To smooth the way for international investors to enter China’s green finance market, the PBOC this year revised issuance guidelines to remove “clean utilisation of fossil fuels” from the list of projects that can qualify as “green”. Photo: Reuters
READ FULL ARTICLE