It is highly unlikely that Beijing would allow a systemically important SOE like China Huarong Asset Management to go under. Photo: Reuters It is highly unlikely that Beijing would allow a systemically important SOE like China Huarong Asset Management to go under. Photo: Reuters
It is highly unlikely that Beijing would allow a systemically important SOE like China Huarong Asset Management to go under. Photo: Reuters
Nicholas Spiro
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Nicholas Spiro

Why uncertainty over China Huarong has echoes of Europe’s debt crisis

  • Concerns about Greece’s huge public debt burden and the mispricing of risk across the euro zone predated the eruption of Europe’s crisis
  • Likewise, weaknesses in China’s corporate bond market, and uncertainty over Beijing’s support for troubled SOEs, have been weighing on sentiment

It is highly unlikely that Beijing would allow a systemically important SOE like China Huarong Asset Management to go under. Photo: Reuters It is highly unlikely that Beijing would allow a systemically important SOE like China Huarong Asset Management to go under. Photo: Reuters
It is highly unlikely that Beijing would allow a systemically important SOE like China Huarong Asset Management to go under. Photo: Reuters
READ FULL ARTICLE
Nicholas Spiro

Nicholas Spiro

Nicholas Spiro is a partner at Lauressa Advisory, a specialist London-based real estate and macroeconomic advisory firm. He is an expert on advanced and emerging economies and a regular commentator on financial and macro-political developments.