A man wearing a mask checks his phone in Times Square in New York on March 22, 2020. Technology has fragmented the media landscape, fuelling a preference for “personalised” information. In this environment, neutral reporting doesn’t attract as much attention as inflammatory reporting. Photo: AFP A man wearing a mask checks his phone in Times Square in New York on March 22, 2020. Technology has fragmented the media landscape, fuelling a preference for “personalised” information. In this environment, neutral reporting doesn’t attract as much attention as inflammatory reporting. Photo: AFP
A man wearing a mask checks his phone in Times Square in New York on March 22, 2020. Technology has fragmented the media landscape, fuelling a preference for “personalised” information. In this environment, neutral reporting doesn’t attract as much attention as inflammatory reporting. Photo: AFP
Prof Zhang Jun
Opinion

Opinion

Prof Zhang Jun

Why America’s growing antagonism towards China can be traced to the US media

  • The shift in sentiment towards China is partly rooted in ideological polarisation, which has impeded US leaders’ ability to govern effectively
  • Back when voters shared the same facts, politicians could appeal to the ‘median voter’. But the fragmenting of the US media landscape has changed the picture

A man wearing a mask checks his phone in Times Square in New York on March 22, 2020. Technology has fragmented the media landscape, fuelling a preference for “personalised” information. In this environment, neutral reporting doesn’t attract as much attention as inflammatory reporting. Photo: AFP A man wearing a mask checks his phone in Times Square in New York on March 22, 2020. Technology has fragmented the media landscape, fuelling a preference for “personalised” information. In this environment, neutral reporting doesn’t attract as much attention as inflammatory reporting. Photo: AFP
A man wearing a mask checks his phone in Times Square in New York on March 22, 2020. Technology has fragmented the media landscape, fuelling a preference for “personalised” information. In this environment, neutral reporting doesn’t attract as much attention as inflammatory reporting. Photo: AFP
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Prof Zhang Jun

Prof Zhang Jun

Zhang Jun is dean of the School of Economics at Fudan University and director of the China Centre for Economic Studies, a Shanghai-based think tank.