Commuters head out of Tokyo Station on May 6. In Asia, surveys conducted last year showed that most workers missed the social interaction that office life brings. Photo: Kyodo Commuters head out of Tokyo Station on May 6. In Asia, surveys conducted last year showed that most workers missed the social interaction that office life brings. Photo: Kyodo
Commuters head out of Tokyo Station on May 6. In Asia, surveys conducted last year showed that most workers missed the social interaction that office life brings. Photo: Kyodo
Nicholas Spiro
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Nicholas Spiro

How work from home fatigue is brightening the office market outlook

  • With time, it’s clear the mass work from home experiment necessitated by Covid-19 won’t replace the communal work space that makes collaboration and social interaction possible
  • While demand remains uncertain, investors and occupiers will increasingly favour high-quality office space that can meet the post-pandemic requirements of safety and flexibility

Commuters head out of Tokyo Station on May 6. In Asia, surveys conducted last year showed that most workers missed the social interaction that office life brings. Photo: Kyodo Commuters head out of Tokyo Station on May 6. In Asia, surveys conducted last year showed that most workers missed the social interaction that office life brings. Photo: Kyodo
Commuters head out of Tokyo Station on May 6. In Asia, surveys conducted last year showed that most workers missed the social interaction that office life brings. Photo: Kyodo
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Nicholas Spiro

Nicholas Spiro

Nicholas Spiro is a partner at Lauressa Advisory, a specialist London-based real estate and macroeconomic advisory firm. He is an expert on advanced and emerging economies and a regular commentator on financial and macro-political developments.