Times Square is empty due to coronavirus restrictions after the New Year’s Eve Ball drops in New York on January 1. Despite the pandemic, stock markets have been largely buoyant so far this year. Photo: EPA-EFE Times Square is empty due to coronavirus restrictions after the New Year’s Eve Ball drops in New York on January 1. Despite the pandemic, stock markets have been largely buoyant so far this year. Photo: EPA-EFE
Times Square is empty due to coronavirus restrictions after the New Year’s Eve Ball drops in New York on January 1. Despite the pandemic, stock markets have been largely buoyant so far this year. Photo: EPA-EFE
Andy Xie
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Andy Xie

From towering debt to bitcoin’s boom, why 2021 is the year of living dangerously

  • Vaccination is unshackling major developed economies and money is flowing into real economies, sparking overheating and inflation
  • This may spell the end of the speculative boom in both traditional financial markets and new products like cryptocurrencies and NFTs

Times Square is empty due to coronavirus restrictions after the New Year’s Eve Ball drops in New York on January 1. Despite the pandemic, stock markets have been largely buoyant so far this year. Photo: EPA-EFE Times Square is empty due to coronavirus restrictions after the New Year’s Eve Ball drops in New York on January 1. Despite the pandemic, stock markets have been largely buoyant so far this year. Photo: EPA-EFE
Times Square is empty due to coronavirus restrictions after the New Year’s Eve Ball drops in New York on January 1. Despite the pandemic, stock markets have been largely buoyant so far this year. Photo: EPA-EFE
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Andy Xie

Andy Xie

Dr Andy Xie is a Shanghai-based independent economist specialising in China and Asia, and writes, speaks and consults on global economics and financial markets. He joined Morgan Stanley in 1997 and was managing director and head of the firm’s Asia-Pacific economics team until 2006. Prior to that he spent two years with Macquarie Bank in Singapore, where he was an associate director in corporate finance. He also spent five years as an economist with the World Bank. He was voted one of the 50 most influential persons in finance by Bloomberg magazine in 2013.