Local retirees gather to sing Red Army revolutionary songs in the city of Zunyi in Guizhou province on April 12. China is considering raising the retirement age, which is now 60 for men and up to 55 for women. Photo: AP
Local retirees gather to sing Red Army revolutionary songs in the city of Zunyi in Guizhou province on April 12. China is considering raising the retirement age, which is now 60 for men and up to 55 for women. Photo: AP
Aidan Yao
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Aidan Yao

Four ways China’s economy can rise to the population challenge

  • The three-child policy is unlikely to reverse the demographic slide, but China can mitigate likely impacts on the economy
  • Besides raising the retirement age, it could make the most of its educated workers, adopt automation and consider outsourcing

Local retirees gather to sing Red Army revolutionary songs in the city of Zunyi in Guizhou province on April 12. China is considering raising the retirement age, which is now 60 for men and up to 55 for women. Photo: AP
Local retirees gather to sing Red Army revolutionary songs in the city of Zunyi in Guizhou province on April 12. China is considering raising the retirement age, which is now 60 for men and up to 55 for women. Photo: AP
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