(From left) Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, president of the European Council Charles Michel, US President Joe Biden, Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi, French President Emmanuel Macron, president of the European Commission Ursula von der Leyen and German chancellor Angela Merkel on the first day of the G7 summit in Cornwall, Britain, on June 11. Photo: EPA-EFE
(From left) Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, president of the European Council Charles Michel, US President Joe Biden, Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi, French President Emmanuel Macron, president of the European Commission Ursula von der Leyen and German chancellor Angela Merkel on the first day of the G7 summit in Cornwall, Britain, on June 11. Photo: EPA-EFE
David Dodwell
Opinion

Opinion

Inside Out by David Dodwell

Why G7 leaders’ rival plan to China’s Belt and Road Initiative is wrong-headed

  • When it comes to infrastructure, the world does not need competing schemes. It just needs more funding
  • Moreover, Joe Biden is facing a congressional battle over his domestic infrastructure plan and is unlikely to win support for infrastructure building overseas

(From left) Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, president of the European Council Charles Michel, US President Joe Biden, Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi, French President Emmanuel Macron, president of the European Commission Ursula von der Leyen and German chancellor Angela Merkel on the first day of the G7 summit in Cornwall, Britain, on June 11. Photo: EPA-EFE
(From left) Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, president of the European Council Charles Michel, US President Joe Biden, Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi, French President Emmanuel Macron, president of the European Commission Ursula von der Leyen and German chancellor Angela Merkel on the first day of the G7 summit in Cornwall, Britain, on June 11. Photo: EPA-EFE
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