Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi (left) shakes hands with his Japanese counterpart Toshimitsu Motegi prior to a meeting in Tokyo on November 25. 2019. Photo: AP Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi (left) shakes hands with his Japanese counterpart Toshimitsu Motegi prior to a meeting in Tokyo on November 25. 2019. Photo: AP
Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi (left) shakes hands with his Japanese counterpart Toshimitsu Motegi prior to a meeting in Tokyo on November 25. 2019. Photo: AP
Anthony Rowley
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Anthony Rowley

Strains on China-Japan marriage of convenience could trigger a big row

  • The diplomatic dance that Japan and China perform to do business with each other while remaining stand-offish in public could become difficult to maintain before long if things go on as they are

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi (left) shakes hands with his Japanese counterpart Toshimitsu Motegi prior to a meeting in Tokyo on November 25. 2019. Photo: AP Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi (left) shakes hands with his Japanese counterpart Toshimitsu Motegi prior to a meeting in Tokyo on November 25. 2019. Photo: AP
Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi (left) shakes hands with his Japanese counterpart Toshimitsu Motegi prior to a meeting in Tokyo on November 25. 2019. Photo: AP
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Anthony Rowley

Anthony Rowley

Anthony Rowley is a veteran journalist specialising in Asian economic and financial affairs. He was formerly Business Editor and International Finance Editor of the Hong Kong-based Far Eastern Economic Review and worked earlier on The Times newspaper in London