Employees make respiratory masks in a family-owned factory in Miami, Florida, on February 15. As overall demand for PPE collapses, a newly formed American Mask Manufacturers Association has begun pleading for protection, particularly against Chinese “dumping”. Photo: AFP
Employees make respiratory masks in a family-owned factory in Miami, Florida, on February 15. As overall demand for PPE collapses, a newly formed American Mask Manufacturers Association has begun pleading for protection, particularly against Chinese “dumping”. Photo: AFP
David Dodwell
Opinion

Opinion

Inside Out by David Dodwell

US-China trade: why protectionism is no fix for global supply chains

  • A global shortage of PPE early in the pandemic brought home how interconnected the world is, and how vulnerable its supply chains are
  • The answer is not stronger domestic production but, rather, flexible multilateral collaboration

Employees make respiratory masks in a family-owned factory in Miami, Florida, on February 15. As overall demand for PPE collapses, a newly formed American Mask Manufacturers Association has begun pleading for protection, particularly against Chinese “dumping”. Photo: AFP
Employees make respiratory masks in a family-owned factory in Miami, Florida, on February 15. As overall demand for PPE collapses, a newly formed American Mask Manufacturers Association has begun pleading for protection, particularly against Chinese “dumping”. Photo: AFP
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