Part of the New York skyline is seen on July 5. House prices in the US rose 18 per cent in May, compared to a year ago. Photo: Bloomberg Part of the New York skyline is seen on July 5. House prices in the US rose 18 per cent in May, compared to a year ago. Photo: Bloomberg
Part of the New York skyline is seen on July 5. House prices in the US rose 18 per cent in May, compared to a year ago. Photo: Bloomberg
Tai Hui
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Tai Hui

Why asset inflation could be the real danger, not higher consumer prices

  • Three factors have been driving US inflation – energy prices, production bottlenecks and aggressive stimulus programmes
  • But as these risks subside in the next two to three quarters, investors cannot afford to be complacent, given the dangerously high equity valuations and hot property markets

Part of the New York skyline is seen on July 5. House prices in the US rose 18 per cent in May, compared to a year ago. Photo: Bloomberg Part of the New York skyline is seen on July 5. House prices in the US rose 18 per cent in May, compared to a year ago. Photo: Bloomberg
Part of the New York skyline is seen on July 5. House prices in the US rose 18 per cent in May, compared to a year ago. Photo: Bloomberg
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Tai Hui

Tai Hui

Tai Hui is chief market strategist for the Asia-Pacific at JP Morgan Asset Management. Based in Hong Kong, he formulates and disseminates the company's view on the market, economy and investing to financial advisers and investors in Asia. He regularly appears on international and local financial media, including as a guest host on CNBC Asia, as well as Bloomberg TV and Reuters TV.