Women walk past a banner showing a green field and blue sky in the shopping and residential area of Sanlitun, in Beijing, on September 3. Beijing’s clampdown on the residential property market is much tougher than anything implemented, or contemplated, in other major economies. Photo: EPA-EFE Women walk past a banner showing a green field and blue sky in the shopping and residential area of Sanlitun, in Beijing, on September 3. Beijing’s clampdown on the residential property market is much tougher than anything implemented, or contemplated, in other major economies. Photo: EPA-EFE
Women walk past a banner showing a green field and blue sky in the shopping and residential area of Sanlitun, in Beijing, on September 3. Beijing’s clampdown on the residential property market is much tougher than anything implemented, or contemplated, in other major economies. Photo: EPA-EFE
Nicholas Spiro
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Nicholas Spiro

Where others fear to tread, China may succeed in cooling its property market

  • Faced with runaway housing prices, most governments are reluctant to intervene, for fear in part of endangering the post-pandemic recovery
  • By contrast, Beijing has upped the ante in its clampdown. The housing market remains central to its drive to reduce inequalities

Women walk past a banner showing a green field and blue sky in the shopping and residential area of Sanlitun, in Beijing, on September 3. Beijing’s clampdown on the residential property market is much tougher than anything implemented, or contemplated, in other major economies. Photo: EPA-EFE Women walk past a banner showing a green field and blue sky in the shopping and residential area of Sanlitun, in Beijing, on September 3. Beijing’s clampdown on the residential property market is much tougher than anything implemented, or contemplated, in other major economies. Photo: EPA-EFE
Women walk past a banner showing a green field and blue sky in the shopping and residential area of Sanlitun, in Beijing, on September 3. Beijing’s clampdown on the residential property market is much tougher than anything implemented, or contemplated, in other major economies. Photo: EPA-EFE
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Nicholas Spiro

Nicholas Spiro

Nicholas Spiro is a partner at Lauressa Advisory, a specialist London-based real estate and macroeconomic advisory firm. He is an expert on advanced and emerging economies and a regular commentator on financial and macro-political developments.