Maria Ressa (left), co-founder and CEO of Philippines-based news website Rappler, and Dmitry Muratov, editor-in-chief of Russia’s main opposition newspaper Novaya Gazeta, received the Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts to uphold freedom of the press. Photo: AFP/TNS
Maria Ressa (left), co-founder and CEO of Philippines-based news website Rappler, and Dmitry Muratov, editor-in-chief of Russia’s main opposition newspaper Novaya Gazeta, received the Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts to uphold freedom of the press. Photo: AFP/TNS
David Dodwell
Opinion

Opinion

Outside In by David Dodwell

Nobel Peace Prize welcome recognition of good journalism’s indispensable role in society

  • The award to two champions of a free press is a chance to pause and think about what makes good journalism and the essential skills journalists need
  • Clarity, concision and scepticism are crucial at a time of widespread ‘fake news’ and growing distrust of institutions and expertise

Maria Ressa (left), co-founder and CEO of Philippines-based news website Rappler, and Dmitry Muratov, editor-in-chief of Russia’s main opposition newspaper Novaya Gazeta, received the Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts to uphold freedom of the press. Photo: AFP/TNS
Maria Ressa (left), co-founder and CEO of Philippines-based news website Rappler, and Dmitry Muratov, editor-in-chief of Russia’s main opposition newspaper Novaya Gazeta, received the Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts to uphold freedom of the press. Photo: AFP/TNS
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