A health worker administers a dose of Covid-19 vaccine to a person in Bimbo, near Bangui, Central African Republic on November 15. How will legal obligations under a treaty ensure we detect and introduce emergency protections early or develop and distribute vaccines equitably? Photo: AFP
A health worker administers a dose of Covid-19 vaccine to a person in Bimbo, near Bangui, Central African Republic on November 15. How will legal obligations under a treaty ensure we detect and introduce emergency protections early or develop and distribute vaccines equitably? Photo: AFP
David Dodwell
Opinion

Opinion

Inside Out by David Dodwell

Why binding treaty on pandemic response is not best way forward

  • Past experience with negotiating binding treaties suggests seeking one on pandemic response would take too long to have the desired effect
  • Instead, close international cooperation and agreeing on a basic set of ground rules would go a long way towards heading off future pandemics

A health worker administers a dose of Covid-19 vaccine to a person in Bimbo, near Bangui, Central African Republic on November 15. How will legal obligations under a treaty ensure we detect and introduce emergency protections early or develop and distribute vaccines equitably? Photo: AFP
A health worker administers a dose of Covid-19 vaccine to a person in Bimbo, near Bangui, Central African Republic on November 15. How will legal obligations under a treaty ensure we detect and introduce emergency protections early or develop and distribute vaccines equitably? Photo: AFP
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