The US-China trade war began in July 2018, leading to tariffs on some US$550 billion of Chinese goods and US$185 billion of US goods. The phase-one trade deal signed in January 2020 has now expired, leaving the two countries at a stalemate in negotiations. Photo: Shutterstock
The US-China trade war began in July 2018, leading to tariffs on some US$550 billion of Chinese goods and US$185 billion of US goods. The phase-one trade deal signed in January 2020 has now expired, leaving the two countries at a stalemate in negotiations. Photo: Shutterstock
David Brown
Opinion

Opinion

David Brown

An end to the US-China trade war is the world’s best hope for long-term pandemic recovery

  • As global growth slows, the US must increase government spending and taxation, while China can pick up the remaining slack through heavier investment spending
  • Most importantly, though, a return to strong US-China bilateral trade would do much to restore economic confidence

The US-China trade war began in July 2018, leading to tariffs on some US$550 billion of Chinese goods and US$185 billion of US goods. The phase-one trade deal signed in January 2020 has now expired, leaving the two countries at a stalemate in negotiations. Photo: Shutterstock
The US-China trade war began in July 2018, leading to tariffs on some US$550 billion of Chinese goods and US$185 billion of US goods. The phase-one trade deal signed in January 2020 has now expired, leaving the two countries at a stalemate in negotiations. Photo: Shutterstock
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