Avocados from Mexico on sale at a supermarket in Bloomington, Indiana, on February 14. The US briefly banned imports from Michoacan earlier this year after a threat was made against an American federal government inspector working in Mexico. Photo: Getty Images
Avocados from Mexico on sale at a supermarket in Bloomington, Indiana, on February 14. The US briefly banned imports from Michoacan earlier this year after a threat was made against an American federal government inspector working in Mexico. Photo: Getty Images
David Dodwell
Opinion

Opinion

Outside In by David Dodwell

‘The blood diamonds of Mexico’: given avocados’ dodgy credentials, should I still be eating them?

  • To cultivate this ‘green gold’, Mexico’s forests have been stripped and its water table lowered, even as the massive profits attract drug cartels and crime
  • Getting the fruit to Hong Kong also requires expensive temperature-controlled transport and storage as part of tortuous supply chains

Avocados from Mexico on sale at a supermarket in Bloomington, Indiana, on February 14. The US briefly banned imports from Michoacan earlier this year after a threat was made against an American federal government inspector working in Mexico. Photo: Getty Images
Avocados from Mexico on sale at a supermarket in Bloomington, Indiana, on February 14. The US briefly banned imports from Michoacan earlier this year after a threat was made against an American federal government inspector working in Mexico. Photo: Getty Images
READ FULL ARTICLE