A boy stands next to a wall along a flooded road in Jakarta, Indonesia, in 2020. Amid climate change, governments should track environmental health risks to children. Photo: EPA-EFE
A boy stands next to a wall along a flooded road in Jakarta, Indonesia, in 2020. Amid climate change, governments should track environmental health risks to children. Photo: EPA-EFE
Siddhi Aryal
Opinion

Opinion

Siddhi Aryal and Daniel Kass

To protect children from climate change, measure environmental health risks

  • Although environmental risks are a major cause of childhood illness and death in Asia, many governments lack ready access to comparable data
  • Developing children’s environmental health indicators is one way to assess existing conditions and evaluate progress in improving children’s health

A boy stands next to a wall along a flooded road in Jakarta, Indonesia, in 2020. Amid climate change, governments should track environmental health risks to children. Photo: EPA-EFE
A boy stands next to a wall along a flooded road in Jakarta, Indonesia, in 2020. Amid climate change, governments should track environmental health risks to children. Photo: EPA-EFE
READ FULL ARTICLE