Sheep graze on the Guadiana River’s dry bed in Villarta de los Montes, in the central Spanish region of Extremadura on Tuesday. Scientists say human-induced climate change is making extreme weather, including heatwaves and droughts, more frequent and intense. Photo: AFP
Sheep graze on the Guadiana River’s dry bed in Villarta de los Montes, in the central Spanish region of Extremadura on Tuesday. Scientists say human-induced climate change is making extreme weather, including heatwaves and droughts, more frequent and intense. Photo: AFP
Brian P. Klein
Opinion

Opinion

Brian P. Klein

How a circular economy will let the world fight climate change and ensure growth

  • The degrowth movement is gaining popularity, but neither people nor countries are ready to stop consuming in the name of the environment
  • Instead, we can use the power of economic incentives to dramatically alter the type of growth going forward and still head off climate change

Sheep graze on the Guadiana River’s dry bed in Villarta de los Montes, in the central Spanish region of Extremadura on Tuesday. Scientists say human-induced climate change is making extreme weather, including heatwaves and droughts, more frequent and intense. Photo: AFP
Sheep graze on the Guadiana River’s dry bed in Villarta de los Montes, in the central Spanish region of Extremadura on Tuesday. Scientists say human-induced climate change is making extreme weather, including heatwaves and droughts, more frequent and intense. Photo: AFP
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