An aerial view of Macau in 2019. Although Macau’s gaming revenues dipped below Las Vegas’ this year, they need only stabilise at a much lower level than the US$36 billion achieved in 2019 for Macau to reclaim the crown as the world’s biggest gambling hub. Photo: Xinhua
An aerial view of Macau in 2019. Although Macau’s gaming revenues dipped below Las Vegas’ this year, they need only stabilise at a much lower level than the US$36 billion achieved in 2019 for Macau to reclaim the crown as the world’s biggest gambling hub. Photo: Xinhua
Nicholas Spiro
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Nicholas Spiro

Macau’s property market has taken a hard knock, but the dice are loaded in the city’s favour long-term

  • China’s tough line on vice and its zero-Covid approach have hurt Macau’s gaming industry over the past several years and its real estate markets more recently
  • However, in the long run, Beijing will still prefer a more tightly controlled gambling market on the mainland’s doorstep to a free-for-all across China

An aerial view of Macau in 2019. Although Macau’s gaming revenues dipped below Las Vegas’ this year, they need only stabilise at a much lower level than the US$36 billion achieved in 2019 for Macau to reclaim the crown as the world’s biggest gambling hub. Photo: Xinhua
An aerial view of Macau in 2019. Although Macau’s gaming revenues dipped below Las Vegas’ this year, they need only stabilise at a much lower level than the US$36 billion achieved in 2019 for Macau to reclaim the crown as the world’s biggest gambling hub. Photo: Xinhua
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