Eric Martinez, a graduate student in the brain and cognitive science department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, holding a Zimbabwean 10 trillion dollar bill on Sept 9. Martinez shares the Ig Nobel literature prize for research on what makes legal documents unnecessarily difficult to understand. Photo: AP
Eric Martinez, a graduate student in the brain and cognitive science department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, holding a Zimbabwean 10 trillion dollar bill on Sept 9. Martinez shares the Ig Nobel literature prize for research on what makes legal documents unnecessarily difficult to understand. Photo: AP
David Dodwell
Opinion

Opinion

Inside Out by David Dodwell

Where are innovative Hong Kong’s quirky Ig Nobel Prize candidates?

  • The spoof Nobel awards – which went to research on moose crash test dummies, badly written contracts, and so on – make us laugh, but also make us think
  • The winning research shares a quirky spark crucial to most original thinking, essential to any aspiring innovation hub

Eric Martinez, a graduate student in the brain and cognitive science department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, holding a Zimbabwean 10 trillion dollar bill on Sept 9. Martinez shares the Ig Nobel literature prize for research on what makes legal documents unnecessarily difficult to understand. Photo: AP
Eric Martinez, a graduate student in the brain and cognitive science department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, holding a Zimbabwean 10 trillion dollar bill on Sept 9. Martinez shares the Ig Nobel literature prize for research on what makes legal documents unnecessarily difficult to understand. Photo: AP
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