Currency exchange booths in Tsim Sha Tsui on June 11, 2020. When the US dollar dives on the foreign exchanges, the Hong Kong dollar inevitably gets dragged down. Photo: Sam Tsang Currency exchange booths in Tsim Sha Tsui on June 11, 2020. When the US dollar dives on the foreign exchanges, the Hong Kong dollar inevitably gets dragged down. Photo: Sam Tsang
Currency exchange booths in Tsim Sha Tsui on June 11, 2020. When the US dollar dives on the foreign exchanges, the Hong Kong dollar inevitably gets dragged down. Photo: Sam Tsang
Neal Kimberley
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Neal Kimberley

What it means for Hong Kong if the world turns against the US dollar

  • The safe-haven buying propping up the US dollar will recede. As inflation worries grow, a lax Fed response could turn currency markets away – leaving the Hong Kong dollar at risk

Currency exchange booths in Tsim Sha Tsui on June 11, 2020. When the US dollar dives on the foreign exchanges, the Hong Kong dollar inevitably gets dragged down. Photo: Sam Tsang Currency exchange booths in Tsim Sha Tsui on June 11, 2020. When the US dollar dives on the foreign exchanges, the Hong Kong dollar inevitably gets dragged down. Photo: Sam Tsang
Currency exchange booths in Tsim Sha Tsui on June 11, 2020. When the US dollar dives on the foreign exchanges, the Hong Kong dollar inevitably gets dragged down. Photo: Sam Tsang
READ FULL ARTICLE
Neal Kimberley

Neal Kimberley

UK-based Neal Kimberley has been active in the financial markets since 1985. Having worked in sales and trading in the dealing rooms of major banks in London for many years, he moved to ThomsonReuters in 2009 to provide market analysis. He has been contributing to the Post since 2015 and writes about macroeconomics from a market perspective, with a particular emphasis on currencies and interest rates.