A customer surveys empty shelves in a Co-op supermarket in Harpenden, Britain, on September 22, amid a shortage of delivery drivers. Global supply chain constraints are making it difficult for manufacturers to meet their orders and pushing up costs. Photo: Reuters A customer surveys empty shelves in a Co-op supermarket in Harpenden, Britain, on September 22, amid a shortage of delivery drivers. Global supply chain constraints are making it difficult for manufacturers to meet their orders and pushing up costs. Photo: Reuters
A customer surveys empty shelves in a Co-op supermarket in Harpenden, Britain, on September 22, amid a shortage of delivery drivers. Global supply chain constraints are making it difficult for manufacturers to meet their orders and pushing up costs. Photo: Reuters
Kerry Craig
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Kerry Craig

Transitory inflation? That depends on how quickly central bankers act

  • The key is the speed at which monetary and fiscal policy is tightened and how fast wage growth rises
  • Supply and demand imbalances will resolve but pressures from the labour market shortage and continued fiscal spending will linger

A customer surveys empty shelves in a Co-op supermarket in Harpenden, Britain, on September 22, amid a shortage of delivery drivers. Global supply chain constraints are making it difficult for manufacturers to meet their orders and pushing up costs. Photo: Reuters A customer surveys empty shelves in a Co-op supermarket in Harpenden, Britain, on September 22, amid a shortage of delivery drivers. Global supply chain constraints are making it difficult for manufacturers to meet their orders and pushing up costs. Photo: Reuters
A customer surveys empty shelves in a Co-op supermarket in Harpenden, Britain, on September 22, amid a shortage of delivery drivers. Global supply chain constraints are making it difficult for manufacturers to meet their orders and pushing up costs. Photo: Reuters
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