The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has warned the current vaccination rate inconsistencies across countries could also worsen the supply and demand mismatch, and it predicts price pressures on food, oil and housing will persist into 2022 for some developing economies. Photo: Xinhua The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has warned the current vaccination rate inconsistencies across countries could also worsen the supply and demand mismatch, and it predicts price pressures on food, oil and housing will persist into 2022 for some developing economies. Photo: Xinhua
The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has warned the current vaccination rate inconsistencies across countries could also worsen the supply and demand mismatch, and it predicts price pressures on food, oil and housing will persist into 2022 for some developing economies. Photo: Xinhua

Coronavirus outbreaks, poor vaccine access, weak policy pushes IMF to downgrade global economic outlook

  • The International Monetary Fund (IMF) predicts the global economy will grow by 5.9 per cent this year, having predicted 6 per cent growth in July
  • The IMF also marked down its forecast growth rate for China to 8 per cent this year from the 8.1 per cent growth predicted earlier this year

Topic |   Coronavirus pandemic
The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has warned the current vaccination rate inconsistencies across countries could also worsen the supply and demand mismatch, and it predicts price pressures on food, oil and housing will persist into 2022 for some developing economies. Photo: Xinhua The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has warned the current vaccination rate inconsistencies across countries could also worsen the supply and demand mismatch, and it predicts price pressures on food, oil and housing will persist into 2022 for some developing economies. Photo: Xinhua
The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has warned the current vaccination rate inconsistencies across countries could also worsen the supply and demand mismatch, and it predicts price pressures on food, oil and housing will persist into 2022 for some developing economies. Photo: Xinhua
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