Raffles’ banded langur (Presbytis femoralis femoralis) is only found in Singapore and southern Peninsular Malaysia. With only 60 langurs left in Singapore and an estimated 250 to 300 left in Malaysia, it is critically endangered. Photo: courtesy of Andie AngRaffles’ banded langur (Presbytis femoralis femoralis) is only found in Singapore and southern Peninsular Malaysia. With only 60 langurs left in Singapore and an estimated 250 to 300 left in Malaysia, it is critically endangered. Photo: courtesy of Andie Ang
Raffles’ banded langur (Presbytis femoralis femoralis) is only found in Singapore and southern Peninsular Malaysia. With only 60 langurs left in Singapore and an estimated 250 to 300 left in Malaysia, it is critically endangered. Photo: courtesy of Andie Ang

Singapore’s rarest monkeys need love and space to live, says local scientist devoted to saving primates

  • Singaporean scientist Andie Ang searches the wildest parts of the Lion City’s for signs of the extremely rare Raffles’ banded langur
  • As well as helping the surviving 60 langurs left in Singapore, she also travels around Asia to document other monkey species
Topic |   Singapore
Raffles’ banded langur (Presbytis femoralis femoralis) is only found in Singapore and southern Peninsular Malaysia. With only 60 langurs left in Singapore and an estimated 250 to 300 left in Malaysia, it is critically endangered. Photo: courtesy of Andie AngRaffles’ banded langur (Presbytis femoralis femoralis) is only found in Singapore and southern Peninsular Malaysia. With only 60 langurs left in Singapore and an estimated 250 to 300 left in Malaysia, it is critically endangered. Photo: courtesy of Andie Ang
Raffles’ banded langur (Presbytis femoralis femoralis) is only found in Singapore and southern Peninsular Malaysia. With only 60 langurs left in Singapore and an estimated 250 to 300 left in Malaysia, it is critically endangered. Photo: courtesy of Andie Ang
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