A rare spotted linsang, worth thousands of dollars, was among 1,200 live animals seized by customs officers in unmanifested cargo from a barge in Hong Kong. Using a law against serious and organised crime to tackle the illegal trade in wildlife and endangered animal parts could bring better results than current enforcement action. Photo: SCMP A rare spotted linsang, worth thousands of dollars, was among 1,200 live animals seized by customs officers in unmanifested cargo from a barge in Hong Kong. Using a law against serious and organised crime to tackle the illegal trade in wildlife and endangered animal parts could bring better results than current enforcement action. Photo: SCMP
A rare spotted linsang, worth thousands of dollars, was among 1,200 live animals seized by customs officers in unmanifested cargo from a barge in Hong Kong. Using a law against serious and organised crime to tackle the illegal trade in wildlife and endangered animal parts could bring better results than current enforcement action. Photo: SCMP

How the illegal trade in endangered wild animals could be curbed by a law change in Hong Kong

  • A proposal by a legislator, law professor and NGOs to tackle wildlife offences under the Organised and Serious Crimes Ordinance could have a big impact
  • Instead of targeting the human mules who smuggle the animals, the trafficking syndicates and crime bosses who employ them would come under investigation

Topic |   Crime
A rare spotted linsang, worth thousands of dollars, was among 1,200 live animals seized by customs officers in unmanifested cargo from a barge in Hong Kong. Using a law against serious and organised crime to tackle the illegal trade in wildlife and endangered animal parts could bring better results than current enforcement action. Photo: SCMP A rare spotted linsang, worth thousands of dollars, was among 1,200 live animals seized by customs officers in unmanifested cargo from a barge in Hong Kong. Using a law against serious and organised crime to tackle the illegal trade in wildlife and endangered animal parts could bring better results than current enforcement action. Photo: SCMP
A rare spotted linsang, worth thousands of dollars, was among 1,200 live animals seized by customs officers in unmanifested cargo from a barge in Hong Kong. Using a law against serious and organised crime to tackle the illegal trade in wildlife and endangered animal parts could bring better results than current enforcement action. Photo: SCMP
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