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Art

Art

French pop artist brightens Hong Kong with exhibition inspired by wife’s Polaroids

  • Cédrix Crespel’s first solo show in the city includes a huge mural in Central’s Aberdeen Street
  • Called Deep Pola, the exhibition showcases 15 works inspired by his wife
PUBLISHED : Friday, 30 November, 2018, 5:45pm
UPDATED : Friday, 30 November, 2018, 5:49pm

Fashion and pop art are major influences on French multidisciplinary artist Cédrix Crespel’s work. And so are women, in particular his wife and muse, Tiphaine.

Now, 15 of his erotically charged, bright canvases can be seen in his first solo show in Hong Kong. On show at Central’s Galerie Paris 1839, “Deep Pola” also includes a bold, attention-grabbing mural on a wall in Aberdeen Street.

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Crespel might have the look of a tough, hardened rock star, but it’s obvious he is very much in touch with his feminine side. His works are all about celebrating independent and passionate women who defy traditional roles.

For this show, he was inspired by Polaroids taken by his wife; the paintings revolving around their daily life as a married couple.

“My wife and I engaged in an unusual correspondence: for many years she was sending me self-portraits while I was away for work, a sort of photographic conversation, so these have influenced this show,” he says.

Born in France in 1974, Crespel was a designer and art collector before turning to photography and painting.

As for his role models, it’s not surprising to learn he’s into Los Angeles artist Cleon Peterson and German painter Franz Ackermann, both contemporary artists who are known for their bold abstract works.

“I love the work of Ackermann and how he is able to make the link between figuration and abstraction, and his ability to show us strong contemporary artworks while maintaining a coloured and attractive aesthetic,” he says.

Crespel also finds inspiration in the works of French singer Serge Gainsbourg and his muse Jane Birkin.

Deep Pola, showing until January 20 at Galerie Paris 1839, 74 Hollywood Road, Central, tel 2540 4777