An exhibition in Dubai uses 3D printing and digital scans and asks questions about the theft of cultural and material heritage in war-torn societies. On display are pieces such as Ali Cherri’s Graftings. Photo: Dani Baptista An exhibition in Dubai uses 3D printing and digital scans and asks questions about the theft of cultural and material heritage in war-torn societies. On display are pieces such as Ali Cherri’s Graftings. Photo: Dani Baptista
An exhibition in Dubai uses 3D printing and digital scans and asks questions about the theft of cultural and material heritage in war-torn societies. On display are pieces such as Ali Cherri’s Graftings. Photo: Dani Baptista

Technology gives stolen artefacts, lost histories new life at Dubai exhibition, but poses uncomfortable questions

  • The provocative show, titled Phantom Limb, was held in the Jameel Arts Centre in Dubai and hosted work by 13 artists and collectives
  • The often hard-hitting pieces point to the problematic infatuation with new technology to preserve sites and artefacts that have been lost, the curator says

Topic |   Art
An exhibition in Dubai uses 3D printing and digital scans and asks questions about the theft of cultural and material heritage in war-torn societies. On display are pieces such as Ali Cherri’s Graftings. Photo: Dani Baptista An exhibition in Dubai uses 3D printing and digital scans and asks questions about the theft of cultural and material heritage in war-torn societies. On display are pieces such as Ali Cherri’s Graftings. Photo: Dani Baptista
An exhibition in Dubai uses 3D printing and digital scans and asks questions about the theft of cultural and material heritage in war-torn societies. On display are pieces such as Ali Cherri’s Graftings. Photo: Dani Baptista
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