Impostor syndrome can see a person always discounting their achievements and focusing more on their mistakes and failures. Under-represented racial, ethnic and religious minorities are one of the groups in which it is prevalent. Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto Impostor syndrome can see a person always discounting their achievements and focusing more on their mistakes and failures. Under-represented racial, ethnic and religious minorities are one of the groups in which it is prevalent. Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto
Impostor syndrome can see a person always discounting their achievements and focusing more on their mistakes and failures. Under-represented racial, ethnic and religious minorities are one of the groups in which it is prevalent. Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto

Young, Asian, full of potential … and feeling like an ‘impostor’. Why these adults struggle to celebrate their success

  • ‘Impostor syndrome’ is a psychological pattern of chronic self-doubt prevalent among high achievers, racial minorities, children of tiger parents and others
  • Six young Asian adults talk about what caused them to be sufferers and how it has affected their lives

Topic |   Sex and relationships
Impostor syndrome can see a person always discounting their achievements and focusing more on their mistakes and failures. Under-represented racial, ethnic and religious minorities are one of the groups in which it is prevalent. Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto Impostor syndrome can see a person always discounting their achievements and focusing more on their mistakes and failures. Under-represented racial, ethnic and religious minorities are one of the groups in which it is prevalent. Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto
Impostor syndrome can see a person always discounting their achievements and focusing more on their mistakes and failures. Under-represented racial, ethnic and religious minorities are one of the groups in which it is prevalent. Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto
READ FULL ARTICLE