Flowers sit on and around a Buddhist statue at the Mahabodhi temple in Bodh Gaya, Bihar, India. Small companies are recycling some of the flowers left at India’s temples once they die. Photo: Getty Images
Flowers sit on and around a Buddhist statue at the Mahabodhi temple in Bodh Gaya, Bihar, India. Small companies are recycling some of the flowers left at India’s temples once they die. Photo: Getty Images
India

Recycling India’s floral waste: how flowers left as temple offerings are being made into soap, dyes and incense sticks

  • Mountains of flowers are left as offerings at temples in India every day, and when they die they are often thrown into ponds and rivers, clogging them up
  • Small companies have sprung up to recycle floral waste, using it to make incense sticks, dye, coloured powders and compost

Topic |   India
Flowers sit on and around a Buddhist statue at the Mahabodhi temple in Bodh Gaya, Bihar, India. Small companies are recycling some of the flowers left at India’s temples once they die. Photo: Getty Images
Flowers sit on and around a Buddhist statue at the Mahabodhi temple in Bodh Gaya, Bihar, India. Small companies are recycling some of the flowers left at India’s temples once they die. Photo: Getty Images
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