Advertisement
Advertisement
Kavitha Yarlagadda
Kavitha Yarlagadda
Kavitha Yarlagadda is an independent writer based in Hyderabad, India, who writes about the environment, science, health, social media, food, culture and travel. She has a bachelor's degree in civil engineering and a master's degree in environmental science.

While some countries have made aggressive climate change pledges and taken action to live up to them, others are lagging behind or even going backwards. Climate finance, adaptation strategies, mitigation and compensation are all likely to be on the table at the UN climate change conference in Egypt.

videocam

Faced with power shortages due to extreme weather and war, countries from Asia to Europe have taken up coal again, pushing global consumption towards a record high. The great coal phase-down agreed to at the UN climate change conference in Glasgow last year is starting to look more like a phasing in of the fuel.

videocam

The country’s highest court has ruled that single women must have the same abortion rights as their married counterparts. The expansion of access to abortion is not only an important step in a society where premarital sex and abortion still carry deep stigma, but also stands in contrast to developments in the US.

China faces productivity challenges with an ageing population and shrinking workforce, while India risks missing its demographic dividend as its growing population overwhelms economic planning.

videocam
Advertisement

Fears for the sector during the pandemic proved unfounded when global electric vehicle sales rose sharply last year, led by China. Public awareness of climate change, government carbon neutrality targets and lower costs are driving a boom that looks set to continue.

videocam

India’s rising demand for electricity is feeding its power crisis as it reshapes its energy grid to meet the future. Investing in renewable and clean energy, along with strong policies to support and achieve the goals, is the way forward.

videocam

Ukraine was, until the invasion, an increasingly favoured destination for popular Indian filmmakers – and the country’s landscapes have become familiar to film-goers via the big screen.

videocam

Many Indian families started doing their own household chores when coronavirus lockdowns began, causing a sales boom for appliances and leaving domestic workers unemployed.

Flowers left as offerings at temples in India soon die. Community enterprises across the country turn the dead flowers into useful products rather than see them dumped in rivers and ponds.