A woman burns offerings on the street during Hungry Ghost Festival. Some other customs during the festival, however, aren’t necessarily grounded in tradition. Photo: Winson Wong
A woman burns offerings on the street during Hungry Ghost Festival. Some other customs during the festival, however, aren’t necessarily grounded in tradition. Photo: Winson Wong

How Hong Kong gets Hungry Ghost Festival all wrong, following superstitions not rooted in its Buddhist origins

  • Hong Kong celebrates the Hungry Ghost Festival a day earlier than Chinese communities in Southeast Asia, and there are a couple of theories as to why
  • From avoiding char siu restaurants to making lavish offerings for spirits of deceased relatives, some city customs are the products of confusion and pop culture

A woman burns offerings on the street during Hungry Ghost Festival. Some other customs during the festival, however, aren’t necessarily grounded in tradition. Photo: Winson Wong
A woman burns offerings on the street during Hungry Ghost Festival. Some other customs during the festival, however, aren’t necessarily grounded in tradition. Photo: Winson Wong
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