Loh Yok Hing (left), who has mild to moderate dementia and is wheelchair-bound, with her daughter and carer Cindy Teo in Singapore. As the pandemic continues, it is not uncommon for elderly people to feel lonely, anxious and stressed. Photo: Cindy TeoLoh Yok Hing (left), who has mild to moderate dementia and is wheelchair-bound, with her daughter and carer Cindy Teo in Singapore. As the pandemic continues, it is not uncommon for elderly people to feel lonely, anxious and stressed. Photo: Cindy Teo
Loh Yok Hing (left), who has mild to moderate dementia and is wheelchair-bound, with her daughter and carer Cindy Teo in Singapore. As the pandemic continues, it is not uncommon for elderly people to feel lonely, anxious and stressed. Photo: Cindy Teo

How loneliness from social isolation harms the elderly and dementia sufferers – and ways to help them overcome it

  • Many seniors may feel lost, frustrated and confused as a result of the changes caused by the pandemic, with some even having extreme mood swings
  • For carers, patience and understanding is key, and reaching out with regular phone calls or video conferencing can help overall well-being
Topic |   Wellness
Loh Yok Hing (left), who has mild to moderate dementia and is wheelchair-bound, with her daughter and carer Cindy Teo in Singapore. As the pandemic continues, it is not uncommon for elderly people to feel lonely, anxious and stressed. Photo: Cindy TeoLoh Yok Hing (left), who has mild to moderate dementia and is wheelchair-bound, with her daughter and carer Cindy Teo in Singapore. As the pandemic continues, it is not uncommon for elderly people to feel lonely, anxious and stressed. Photo: Cindy Teo
Loh Yok Hing (left), who has mild to moderate dementia and is wheelchair-bound, with her daughter and carer Cindy Teo in Singapore. As the pandemic continues, it is not uncommon for elderly people to feel lonely, anxious and stressed. Photo: Cindy Teo
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