The Chan family in Singapore, including Kristyn and her father Gabriel (both holding dogs). He and his wife (centre) helped Kristyn cope with the effects of ADHD and, like many carers, felt confused, anxious and frustrated. Photo: courtesy of Gabriel Chan
The Chan family in Singapore, including Kristyn and her father Gabriel (both holding dogs). He and his wife (centre) helped Kristyn cope with the effects of ADHD and, like many carers, felt confused, anxious and frustrated. Photo: courtesy of Gabriel Chan
Wellness

Caregivers risk depression and burnout looking after a loved one – how to practise self-care and when to seek help

  • When his daughter needed home care, Singaporean Gabriel Chan didn’t know what to do and felt ‘confused, anxious and frustrated’, as many carers do
  • Amid the pandemic, carers are missing their support network, adding to the risk of burnout. They need to set boundaries and practise self-care, therapists say

Topic |   Wellness
The Chan family in Singapore, including Kristyn and her father Gabriel (both holding dogs). He and his wife (centre) helped Kristyn cope with the effects of ADHD and, like many carers, felt confused, anxious and frustrated. Photo: courtesy of Gabriel Chan
The Chan family in Singapore, including Kristyn and her father Gabriel (both holding dogs). He and his wife (centre) helped Kristyn cope with the effects of ADHD and, like many carers, felt confused, anxious and frustrated. Photo: courtesy of Gabriel Chan
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