Journalist and National Geographic fellow Paul Salopek walks past the Karakus royal tomb, built in the first century BC, in eastern Turkey on his 21,000-mile trek around the world following in the footsteps of early humans. Photo: John Stanmeyer / National Geographic Journalist and National Geographic fellow Paul Salopek walks past the Karakus royal tomb, built in the first century BC, in eastern Turkey on his 21,000-mile trek around the world following in the footsteps of early humans. Photo: John Stanmeyer / National Geographic
Journalist and National Geographic fellow Paul Salopek walks past the Karakus royal tomb, built in the first century BC, in eastern Turkey on his 21,000-mile trek around the world following in the footsteps of early humans. Photo: John Stanmeyer / National Geographic
Asia travel

Following in the footsteps of early humans, this man is walking 21,000 miles around the world – what he’s discovered so far

  • Currently trapped in Myanmar by Covid-19 restrictions, journalist Paul Salopek set off from Ethiopia seven years ago
  • In India, he learned from farmers about ‘a vast and almost existential water crisis’ waiting to explode

Topic |   Asia travel
Journalist and National Geographic fellow Paul Salopek walks past the Karakus royal tomb, built in the first century BC, in eastern Turkey on his 21,000-mile trek around the world following in the footsteps of early humans. Photo: John Stanmeyer / National Geographic Journalist and National Geographic fellow Paul Salopek walks past the Karakus royal tomb, built in the first century BC, in eastern Turkey on his 21,000-mile trek around the world following in the footsteps of early humans. Photo: John Stanmeyer / National Geographic
Journalist and National Geographic fellow Paul Salopek walks past the Karakus royal tomb, built in the first century BC, in eastern Turkey on his 21,000-mile trek around the world following in the footsteps of early humans. Photo: John Stanmeyer / National Geographic
READ FULL ARTICLE