Thomas Wong Chung-hang runs the People on Board, a social enterprise intended to use the power of play to bring people together and which has donated more than 2,000 boxes of board games to eight social welfare organisations for them to pass onto low-income families. Photo: K.Y. Cheng Thomas Wong Chung-hang runs the People on Board, a social enterprise intended to use the power of play to bring people together and which has donated more than 2,000 boxes of board games to eight social welfare organisations for them to pass onto low-income families. Photo: K.Y. Cheng
Thomas Wong Chung-hang runs the People on Board, a social enterprise intended to use the power of play to bring people together and which has donated more than 2,000 boxes of board games to eight social welfare organisations for them to pass onto low-income families. Photo: K.Y. Cheng
Environment

Politics, climate change, the menstrual cycle – board games use the power of play to build understanding of real-world issues

  • Thomas Wong, a Hong Kong social worker, designed a board game about global warming. Designers in the city and in India built games around politics
  • Games with social themes can reveal uncomfortable truths, Wong says. It’s difficult to gain attention or funding for them, though, and many rely on crowdfunding

Topic |   Environment
Thomas Wong Chung-hang runs the People on Board, a social enterprise intended to use the power of play to bring people together and which has donated more than 2,000 boxes of board games to eight social welfare organisations for them to pass onto low-income families. Photo: K.Y. Cheng Thomas Wong Chung-hang runs the People on Board, a social enterprise intended to use the power of play to bring people together and which has donated more than 2,000 boxes of board games to eight social welfare organisations for them to pass onto low-income families. Photo: K.Y. Cheng
Thomas Wong Chung-hang runs the People on Board, a social enterprise intended to use the power of play to bring people together and which has donated more than 2,000 boxes of board games to eight social welfare organisations for them to pass onto low-income families. Photo: K.Y. Cheng
READ FULL ARTICLE