A super blood moon turns orangey-red (above, right). The colour fades as a partial eclipse ensues (above, centre), followed by a penumbral eclipse, when the moon appears a dulled grey (above. left). Photo: Getty Images/Westend61
A super blood moon turns orangey-red (above, right). The colour fades as a partial eclipse ensues (above, centre), followed by a penumbral eclipse, when the moon appears a dulled grey (above. left). Photo: Getty Images/Westend61
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Pacific Rim super blood moon lunar eclipse this week: when it is, what to expect, and which places will have the best view

  • A super moon happens when a full moon occurs at the point the moon’s orbit brings it closest to Earth. A blood moon appears when it moves through Earth’s shadow
  • A combination of these events occurs on Wednesday, with a total lunar eclipse, then a partial and a penumbral eclipse; the moon appears red, then fades to grey

A super blood moon turns orangey-red (above, right). The colour fades as a partial eclipse ensues (above, centre), followed by a penumbral eclipse, when the moon appears a dulled grey (above. left). Photo: Getty Images/Westend61
A super blood moon turns orangey-red (above, right). The colour fades as a partial eclipse ensues (above, centre), followed by a penumbral eclipse, when the moon appears a dulled grey (above. left). Photo: Getty Images/Westend61
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