The Beach Boys, who have been making music for more than five decades, return to Hong Kong this month – albeit with just one founding member, Mike Love – to strut their stuff with the Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra. In 1968, Charles Manson and his “family” lived with the band’s original drummer, Dennis Wilson, and the Beach Boys recorded the criminal madman’s Cease to Exist, renaming it Never Learn Not to Love. The surf pop dudes had bigger hits with Good Vibrations, Wouldn’t It Be Nice and Kokomo, released to coincide with the 1988 flick Cocktail, starring Tom Cruise and Bryan Brown …

Born in Sydney in 1947, Brown’s rugged looks and “streuth mate” accent made him the perfect candidate for larrikin Aussie roles. He has collaborated five times with his British wife, Rachel Ward, whom he married in 1983. The couple have three children, a fact Brown predicted upon meeting Ward and “reading” her palm. Brown has starred in several international productions, including the 1986 film Tai-Pan, based on James Clavell’s 1966 novel about Western traders in 19th-century Hong Kong. One of the characters in Tai-Pan is Gordon Chen, loosely based on Sir Robert Hotung …

A successful businessman, Robert Ho Tung Bosman was born in the city in 1862. He founded the Chinese Club, an alternative to the colonial Hong Kong Club, which excluded those who were not British and white. It is claimed that he was the “first Chinese person to be allowed to live on Victoria Peak”, which is untrue, and not just because he wasn’t all that Chinese: his father was a British national of Dutch descent. Hotung already owned property in the poshest part of town when the Peak Reservation Ordinance was enacted, in 1904. At his lofty properties he hosted many famous visitors over the years, including George Bernard Shaw …

An Irish playwright and critic, Shaw wrote more than 60 plays before he fell off a ladder while trimming a tree, thereby bringing his life to an end at the ripe old age of 94. Bernard Shaw (he didn’t like using the George) is the only person to have won both a Nobel Prize (for Literature, in 1925) and an Oscar (for “best writing, screenplay”, in 1939, for Pygmalion). The screenplay was adapted into the 1964 film My Fair Lady, starring Audrey Hepburn …

Born Audrey Kathleen Ruston in 1929, in Brussels, Belgium, Hepburn became Edda van Heemstra in 1940 – by which time she was living in the Netherlands – to evade capture by the German army: an English sounding name was considered dangerous during the wartime occupation. She acted as an agent of the Dutch resistance, carrying secret messages in her ballet slippers. Less dangerous footwear was worn by Hepburn in films such as Roman Holiday (1953), Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961) and Sabrina (1954), which was remade in 1995 with a cast that included Paul Giamatti …

Paul Edward Valentine Giamatti, an American actor who plays likeable, nervous-looking characters, has been in the industry for more than 20 years, his big break coming in 1997, as Kenny “Pig Vomit” Rushton in the film adaptation of Howard Stern’s Private Parts. In the 1998 remake of Dr Dolittle, Giamatti portrays a human in charge of a talking orangutan; in the 2001 remake of Planet of the Apes, he plays a talking orangutan in charge of humans. He is a psychologist in Love & Mercy (2014), the biopic of musician-songwriter Brian Wilson, the original creative force behind the Beach Boys.