A worker, wearing protective suits and masks, in front of storage tanks for radioactive water at the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Photo: AP A worker, wearing protective suits and masks, in front of storage tanks for radioactive water at the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Photo: AP
A worker, wearing protective suits and masks, in front of storage tanks for radioactive water at the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Photo: AP
Japan

Explainer |
How dangerous is Japan’s Fukushima nuclear plant 10 years after meltdowns?

  • Radiation levels have declined, allowing workers and visitors to wear regular clothes and surgical masks in most areas
  • But Japan doesn’t yet have a plan to dispose of the highly radioactive melted fuel, debris and waste at the plant

Topic |   Japan
A worker, wearing protective suits and masks, in front of storage tanks for radioactive water at the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Photo: AP A worker, wearing protective suits and masks, in front of storage tanks for radioactive water at the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Photo: AP
A worker, wearing protective suits and masks, in front of storage tanks for radioactive water at the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Photo: AP
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