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Consumers

Two of 45 sanitary towel samples tested in Hong Kong have leakage problems, Consumer Council says

Outliers made in accordance with standards set in mainland China and Taiwan

PUBLISHED : Thursday, 14 June, 2018, 5:34pm
UPDATED : Thursday, 14 June, 2018, 7:01pm

Two of 45 sanitary towel samples tested in Hong Kong were found to have leakage problems while absorption rates among the products differed greatly, the city’s consumer watchdog said on Thursday.

But the Consumer Council claimed none of the 45 samples contained harmful chemicals.

Menstrual pads made by Organyc from the US and Natracare from the UK were found to leak slightly. The products were made in accordance with standards set in mainland China and Taiwan.

“The performance of sanitary towels varied vastly in our absorption tests,” Consumer Council chief executive Gilly Wong Fung-han said.

In addition, the watchdog found the absorption rates of sanitary towels labelled “instant soaking” were as high as five times faster than those that were not.

Prices for the 45 sampled products range from HK$0.42 to HK$4.99 per pad. The tested products were made on the mainland as well as in Canada, Hungary, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Sweden, Taiwan and Vietnam.

Wholesale merchants of British brand Natracare said its products complied with Japan’s standards for sanitary towels. It claimed it presented the council a certificate from an independent laboratory, and argued the liquid used in the tests was different from blood that sanitary pads are meant to absorb.

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Organyc said it did not see any leakage when employing the watchdog’s test method. The brand said its products complied with regulations in Europe and the US. It added that organic products such as its own should not be compared with those that are not.

Another tested product to drew attention was Kotex, which is produced by American personal care company Kimberly-Clark. One of its products was found on its packaging to lack information on the ingredients in its pads.

The council also noted some menstrual pads could contain fragrant materials that were harmful to people allergic to such chemicals.