A row of teeth are seen on the lower jaw of a 300-million-year-old shark fossil, nicknamed the “Godzilla shark”. Photo: John-Paul Hodnett via AP A row of teeth are seen on the lower jaw of a 300-million-year-old shark fossil, nicknamed the “Godzilla shark”. Photo: John-Paul Hodnett via AP
A row of teeth are seen on the lower jaw of a 300-million-year-old shark fossil, nicknamed the “Godzilla shark”. Photo: John-Paul Hodnett via AP
Science

300 million-year-old ‘Godzilla shark’ gets formal name

  • First discovered in New Mexico, Dracopristis hoffmanorum, or Hoffman’s Dragon Shark, has now been identified as a distinct species
  • The ancient marine creature got its nickname for its long fin spines

Topic |   Science
A row of teeth are seen on the lower jaw of a 300-million-year-old shark fossil, nicknamed the “Godzilla shark”. Photo: John-Paul Hodnett via AP A row of teeth are seen on the lower jaw of a 300-million-year-old shark fossil, nicknamed the “Godzilla shark”. Photo: John-Paul Hodnett via AP
A row of teeth are seen on the lower jaw of a 300-million-year-old shark fossil, nicknamed the “Godzilla shark”. Photo: John-Paul Hodnett via AP
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